Photo Credit: Karen Noemi Murga

Photo Credit: Karen Noemi Murga

HARD Summer 2017 10 Year Celebration was one for the books. It brought out some of musics most diverse artists and djs. The dubstep legend himself, Doctor P preformed an amazing closing set at the Green Stage. His set left our necks sore and still wanting more.

Karen:

You're truly a pioneer of dubstep. How'd you get in to DJ'ing?

Doctor P:

I was into production first. I cared about the production side. Every producer is a DJ as well, so I was like, "I guess I better learn how to DJ, then." But the production was always a focus for me.

Karen:

What music did you grow up listening to?

Doctor P:

To begin with, at home we only ever had Top 40 radio. That was all we ever listened to at home. And when I got to probably about 12 or something, I discovered Eminem, you know, Dre and Snoop Dogg, and a few metal bands, System of a Down and Slipknot and stuff.

Karen:

I love them!

Doctor P:

And yeah, all that music came out, and it blew my mind. And I discovered some Drum & Bass, it just opened my eyes seeing there was more music than just the Top 40 chart music. And I pretty much started making music straight away. I heard Drum & Bass and I thought, "This is people in their bedroom making this, so I should be able to make this." So I just started learning how to do it.

Karen:

When did djing become more than a hobby for you?

Doctor P:

I mean, I knew probably from about 18. I knew I wanted to do it as like a job. But it wasn't until I was probably about 23 when I actually started making money. So it took about five years of trying really hard to cross sides and make a living.

 Photo Credit: Karen Noemi Murga

Photo Credit: Karen Noemi Murga

Karen:

What makes HARD different than other festivals you play?

Doctor P:

It's definitely a lot more going on. There's stuff everywhere, people everywhere, it's chaos. It feels like two crowds, and it feels like there's two crowds mingling. It's not a bad thing. When you go to EDC, it's just one type of person that goes there. But when you come here, there's different kinds of people. It's a different vibe.

Karen:

Yeah, definitely. Do you like producing more or DJ'ing more?

Doctor P:

They're just totally different. Producing is what I always cared about, but being up on stage in front of thousands of people is obviously quite good. I like doing it. I like doing it for an hour and then just not doing it again. It's good to do sometimes, but I don't want to ... Some DJ's are out there every night. I don't want to do that.

Karen:

Your next show is in Spain, right? Next month?

Doctor P:

Yeah, yeah.

Karen:

It's pretty spaced out, that's pretty cool.

Doctor P:

Yeah, sometimes I do three or four per week. And then sometimes I do one in a month. It really depends what's going on for shows.

Karen:

How would you describe dubstep fans?

Doctor P:

I feel like they care about the music. They really care about the music. They're not necessarily in it to be cool or to listen to what everyone's listening to. You listen to dubstep, you really like dubstep basically.

Karen:

Yeah. You like that beat.

Doctor P:

Exactly. You just want to go and rage, basically.

 Photo Credit: Karen Noemi Murga

Photo Credit: Karen Noemi Murga

Karen:

So what's it like being a dubstep dad, and has it changed the way you are performing or producing or you feel it's the same?

Doctor P:

I think I've been a dad for more time now than I wasn't a dad, so being a dad is totally normal to me. I always liked being at home anyway , so it's not like I lived on the road the whole time. I'd always go straight back home. So now I just do that . I'm not a DJ at all when I'm at home. I like dropping him off at school and being a totally not-DJ guy.

Karen:

Yeah, of course. So how old do your kids have to be to go inside a mosh pit?

Doctor P:

My boy is five. So he's not there yet.Give him about ten years.It's not necessarily age, it's more physical size, isn't it? How strong your elbows are if you're in the mosh pit. I think I was about 15 when I first went in a mosh pit. I think I only went in a mosh pit three times. I was like, "This is not for me."

Karen:

Really?

Doctor P:

Yeah. I prefer playing the music, not dancing to it.

Karen:

Oh, wow. I'll go in the pit. I'll go for you. (laughs)

So your record label, Circus Records, really sets the bar high for dubstep. What do you look for in talent?

Doctor P:

We just look for people who are doing something interesting. Really, that's all we care about. If they're doing something, even if it's not going to be the next big insanely popular thing, if that person's doing something quite new and we're actually interested, we'd rather put that out. 

Karen:

Is there any collaboration you'd like to see happen?

Doctor P:

I would like to do some more collaborations. I feel like everybody collaborates with everybody now. I never really collaborate, so I feel like I should just go and collaborate with everybody, just because that's the way the world does now. I should just go and do 20 collaborations. It's half as much work to finish a collaboration. I just make half of two.

 Photo Credit: Karen Noemi Murga

Photo Credit: Karen Noemi Murga

Karen:

Where do you see dubstep evolving in five or ten years?

Doctor P:

I feel like it's become ... It's solid now. It's exactly what it is now. It hasn't changed for a few years. It is what it is. Every now and then, someone will come out with a new bass sound or something. And everyone will do that for a year. So I feel like it's going to do what Drum & Bass did, I think. It's going to go forever. It's its own thing now. I don't think it's going to completely change. I don't think it's going to disappear.  It's its own thing. It's just going to stay there, I think. I might be wrong. I'm normally wrong.

Karen:

Some of your songs like Big Boss and Tetris give me Nintendo vibes. What was your favorite game growing up?

Doctor P:

I had a Game Boy and a Sega Vega drive. I never had a Nintendo growing up. I had a Game Boy with Tetris for a year, but no other games. That's why I made the song.

Karen:

So that was your favorite, then?

Doctor P:

It was the only game I had when I was 12 years old, so that song was drilled into my head. That's why I made the song.Yeah, Tetris is not even a good game in its essence, but it was the only game I had.

Karen:

So what can your fans expect next from you?

Doctor P:

I haven't put a song out in a couple of months now. So trying to get some more music out at the moment. I've got about 20 half-finished tracks. I just need to finish something and get it out. So I'm going to just keep putting music out. That's what the future holds for me. Every few months, another track–for the foreseeable future.

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